Phil and the Osophers

Phil and the Osophers

PHIL AND THE OSOPHERS | FROM THE RISE OF FALL | FACTUAL FABRICATIONS | TBD

 

Bio:

Phil and the Osophers… Philosophers.

Such a fun pun (as recognized by Teen Vogue), one can only help but root for Philip Radiotes to have the same amount of success with his songs, and hey, he pulls it off!

Currently finishing up a new album From The Rise of Fall (another smart turn of phrase), Radiotes and his band (there is no band) will release a series of singles and music videos (also sharp as tacks) throughout early 2019. First single “Bee Liner” is out now with a green screen extravaganza on the way. “Endeavor” is scheduled for release on March 15th.

Originally from San Francisco, the now Brooklyn-based songwriter and multi-instrumentalist performs everything you’ll hear on From The Rise of Fall, which is only a white lie (Radiotes didn’t play the Sax or the Cello or every single drum fill, just almost all of them.)

The sound is very much that of a Brooklyn-transplanted San Franciscan, combining sunshine-y surf-rock with NYC swagger, blending folk rock with Dub influenced African style guitars, heavily rhythmic drumming and psychedelic world music elements.

On stage, Radiotes is joined by Pat Petillo on bass and Kevin Estrada on drums (there is a band!) to recreate this layered sound he meticulously constructs on his recordings –his many recordings. From The Rise of Fall is actually Radiotes’ lucky 13th release! See below for more on where he’s been prior to you reading this.

As one might expect from a punny philosopher, Radiotes writes songs that will appeal to nerds, thinkers, readers, fans of the Dead, Dylan, Heads, Kinks, Cohen, and They Might Be Giants (and, likely, also to John and John of They Might Be Giants themselves.) Seriously, though, philosophical ideas are the lyrical focus here, encompassing revelatory, visionary, and transformative themes.

The songs explore complex issues from wiretapping to suicide bombings, technological isolation and overstimulation, immigration and working class issues like commuting, and banking,” Radiotes explains. “Relationship issues are weaved in throughout to speak to broader issues in a personal way.”

Radiotes realizes that considering the name of his band – and his biographer probably isn’t helping – that he may come across as merely humorous, but he wants to make sure that his deeper intentions connect.

“I’ve felt how strongly a song can affect a person and I try to dig as deeply as I can to create songs that have that sort of impact,” he says, and he has been doing that for a long time, creating a catalog of songs that have landed Radiotes sync licensing deals with CNN (“This Is Life with Lisa Ling”), Fox Sports, IFC, BET, VH1, TLC (“Say Yes To The Dress”), and Viceland.

“For me, the feedback loop is creative; a lot more energy circulates around writing songs than it does to push people to pay attention to them,” Radiotes humbly confesses of the seven albums, three Christmas EPs, and a 7-inch single that he has released in the years prior to realizing that From The Rise of Fall deserved a bigger audience.

Some not so humble stats, though: the Christmas tunes by Phil and the Osophers have a combined 100,000 Spotify and YouTube plays and all cassette releases of previous albums have long sold out.

Not to mention, Radiotes is also an actor. He can previously be seen playing Buddy Holly in the HBO series “Vinyl” and has a role in the upcoming Martin Scorsese’s film “The Irishman,” out in 2019. His acting work on behalf of himself (watch Radiotes playing a music executive and an eye doctor) is statuette worthy, frankly.

Radiotes takes on his next great role in the music video for the From The Rise of Fall single “Bee Liner,” which makes use of the Fairlight CVI, “an amazing, long lost video synthesizer from the 80s,” according to Radiotes.

While explaining more about the Fairlight CVI, Radiotes casually mentions the following: “I was first introduced to it when I was super young.  I did a music service video to Michael Jackson’s ‘Bad.’

Naturally, this footage has now been dragged out of retirement.

“I have to brace for the reaction to it,” Radiotes says. “That video has been put on at family events, to my embarrassment. But I guess it’s the perfect companion piece to ‘Bee Liner,’ so perhaps it’s time to have it out there.”

Not so humble!

Listen to the latest single “Bee Liner” by Phil and the Osophers, out now. The “Bee Liner” music video, along with the band’s next single and music “Endeavor,” are coming soon. Look out for the eighth Phil and the Osophers full-length From The Rise of Fall this summer.

News:

PRESS QUOTES:

Crafting catchy, literate songs that blend musical genres from folk rock to world beat.
— Relix
The music he creates doesn’t fall within cookie-cutter patterns and avoids current trends, instead creating music with psychedelic elements into structures that are pop-oriented. But he’s not just another pop songwriter.
— Ghettoblaster
Greek tragedy in pop form.
— Aupium
Phil Radiotes  as photographed by Kenneth Anderson.  Click for hi-res.

Phil Radiotes as photographed by Kenneth Anderson. Click for hi-res.

Phil Radiotes  as photographed by Sharon Steel.  Click for hi-res.

Phil Radiotes as photographed by Sharon Steel. Click for hi-res.

Phil Radiotes  as photographed by Sharon Steel.  Click for hi-res.

Phil Radiotes as photographed by Sharon Steel. Click for hi-res.

From The Rise of Fall   cover art.  Click for hi-res.

From The Rise of Fall cover art. Click for hi-res.

“Bee Liner”  single cover art.  Click for hi-res.

“Bee Liner” single cover art. Click for hi-res.